Meetings

Community Health Committee

The Community Health Committee (CHC) is HIP's coalition and has included over 200 participants from diverse organizations including health systems, government, schools, community-based organizations, business, neighborhood and faith-based groups, and individual citizens. Anyone is welcome to attend. See presentations and handouts from previous meetings on the right.

Maternal Child Health Needs Assessment

August 3, 2017 meeting

The August CHC meeting focused on the health of women, children and families. The goal was to discuss ways to make Washtenaw County a healthier and more equitable place to become pregnant and raise a child. During the meeting, we reviewed current data (all of which can be viewed through the "data" link on the right) on the health of pregnant women, infants, children and teens in our community. We looked at some of the community-wide indicators together and then split up into groups to dive more deeply into data related to pregnancy/post-partum, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and women of childbearing age. 

This meeting was part of our community assessment process and will help lead to a plan for action.

Access to Affordable and Healthy Food: Challenges and Opportunities

June 21, 2017 meeting

Access to affordable and healthy food is an essential component of community health and equity. However, food security is not equally distributed here in Washtenaw County.  

Presenters and meeting attendees discussed why food access is important, why food access is an equity issue, challenges at the federal level, rural and small town food access issues, and community based food access work. Find presentations and handouts to the right. Growing Hope also has additional information about the Ypsilanti Farmers Markets and and the Ypsilanti Mobile Farm Stand. Find information about Washtenaw County Public Health food access and healthy eating programs here

Presenters: 

Violent Interactions between Law Enforcement and Black Americans Symposium

March 23, 2017 meeting

The overarching goal of the symposium, sponsored by Washtenaw County Public Health and community partners, was to have a solution-oriented discussion about violent interactions between police and black Americans. The keynote speaker was Dr. Brian Williams, a trauma surgeon who cared for multiple police officers who were killed and injured from targeted shootings in Dallas, TX, in the summer of 2016. The shootings occurred after the police killings of two black men in Baton Rouge, LA and Minneapolis, MN.  

 Four action-teams were created for symposium attendees to join:

    • Civic engagement/activism
    • Community-Police engagement/partnerships
    • Pipeline Programs: school (K-12) to careers in law enforcement
    • Advocacy
 

Health Equity and Community Leadership

November 14, 2016 meeting
 

Washtenaw County is one of the healthiest in Michigan, with high incomes and high rankings as one of the most economically vibrant, educated, healthy, and best places to live in the state. However, we know that healthy outcomes and access to opportunity are not evenly distributed. Race, place, income, and other factors affect individuals’ and communities’ abilities to reach their full potential. Therefore, Washtenaw County Public Health (WCPH) looked to the community for guidance on what to do. 

In the summer of 2016, WCPH organized four community conversations in partnership with the Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation to support intense community discussion, planning, and action within specific neighborhoods and populations. WCPH used existing networks of community-based organizations to engage neighborhood residents, leaders, and organizations in the South of Michigan Avenue neighborhood in the City of Ypsilanti, the West Willow neighborhood in Ypsilanti Township, Whitmore Lake/Northfield Township, and the Latino community. As follow up to the community conversations, each community received a mini-grant to take ownership of a health improvement project developed from the neighborhood priorities. Participants heard from the community leaders who facilitated these events and learned how agencies and organizations can effectively partner with communities to promote health equity and community voice.

Panelists: 

  • Cherisa Allen, Community Member, South of Michigan Avenue in the City of Ypsilanti
  •  Jo Ann McCollum, Vice President, New West Willow Neighborhood Association
  • Marta Larson, Board member: Northfield Human Services, People's Express, Whitmore Lake Foundation for Educational Excellence
  • Felipe Riano, Community Member, IDEA Buenos Vecinos

 

Implementation Team

The Implementation Team is responsible for quality assurance, monitoring health outcomes, interpreting data and information dissemination regarding HIP objectives. Members include representatives from Chelsea Community Hospital, St. Joseph Mercy Health System, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor Center for Independent Living, Washtenaw Health Plan, Ann Arbor YMCA, and Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research.

Coordinating Committee

Coordinating Team is responsible for tracking progress of HIP objectives, setting agenda for the CHC meetings and activities, and assuring that the Implementation Team workplan serves larger HIP/CHC goals. Members include leaders from Chelsea Community Hospital, St. Joseph Mercy Health System, University of Michigan Health System, health department, Washtenaw Intermediate School District, and community volunteers.

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